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Thread: 455 milk shake

  1. #1

    455 milk shake

    Yesterday was my fifth time out on the lake with the new engine, and I'm still working out the carb and timing. I think I finally got it set up pretty well, and broke-in enough for a little 2 minute blast above 4G...

    well, dammit.. I blew a gasket due to too much water pressure. I think it was the timing cover, or maybe the intake manifold but I'm pulling the engine and the heads anyway just to make sure it's not the head gaskets, and to get everything cleaned out good.

    The boat has a standard Berkeley Pack-a-jet setup with the automotive style water pump, and logs and it didn't have any pressure reduction device before. I plan on keeping the automotive water pump setup.

    What is the best solution for reducing the pressure in the engine? An adjustable bypass valve or a regular old gate valve? I've seen both.

    I also noticed that it was pushing oil out of the breathers. This engine has a big pan and Mondello oiling mods. Now I think I need to install some oil return lines. Where exactly do I drill in the heads? Can I just put drains in the covers back to the pan? What size lines should I use as returns?

    Thanks in advance for the advice!

    Here's a picture from yesterday, 'cause everybody loves pictures.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails sag2.jpg  
    Last edited by Hotrodnailhead; 05-13-2012 at 10:21 PM.

  2. #2

    Re: 455 milk shake

    You can buy a bypass regulator that will divert excess water from the engine supply lines to an through hull fitting, thus lowering the pressure going to the engine. I know a couple people that have actually used a pressure regulator like that used in plumbing. I'm sure that someone can tell you the pro and cons of each. My last boat didn't use a regulator and I really didn't have any problem.
    ****Disclaimer - I'm far from being an expert so you may want a second opinion!****

  3. #3

    Re: 455 milk shake

    Heres what you need to do for the head drains on an olds. Do it while the heads are off!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails olds_head_drain.jpg   olds_head_drain2.jpg   olds_head_drain3.jpg  
    It's Impossible to Lose Your Footing, If Your On Your Knees"

  4. #4

    Re: 455 milk shake

    Imo...a water pressure gauge is a must. If my valve off the jet is wide open...I will see 30+ at w.o.t. With the valve adjusted to where I can idle for ever at 160* ish.....it stays under 10psi.

  5. #5

    Re: 455 milk shake

    Regarding the oil drain issue; It seems that welding a bung into the valve cover (near the bottom, of course) would be more efficient for oil draining (and easier than drilling and tapping cast iron). I haven't seen this done anywhere though, so maybe I'm missing something.

    It also seems that you could use a larger diameter fitting or multiple fittings for more flow. But the oil level IN the rocker area would be greater before draining would occur.

    Thoughts?

  6. #6

    Re: 455 milk shake

    The few 455 engines I have built for guys. I modified the head oil drains & notched the block, to open up the stock oil drain locations. There are some pictures and info in this thread- http://www.vintagejetboats.com/showt...5-Tahiti/page2 scroll down to see the block & head mods. I have never installed the big drain tubes. There is also a couple other small block oil passage mods I do to increas oil pressure to the mains & rods. You also do NOT want a High Volume Oil Pump! It is not needed in an Olds Engine!
    It's Impossible to Lose Your Footing, If Your On Your Knees"

  7. #7

    Re: 455 milk shake

    Thanks for the info Tahiti and Wolfie, and I will also be installing a pressure gauge H20'... thanks!

    I ordered a bypass valve from Berkeley, and a head stud kit from ARP. I'm going to use victor intake gaskets, and fel-pro head gaskets. I also decided that I'm going to modify my timing cover/plate to make it more rigid and have better clamping force around the cooling passages. I'll try to take pictures as I go.

    I'm thinking about modifying the valve covers for oil drainage. I'm looking at the methods that others have done, and I'm curious why everyone runs the lines in the rear of the heads. There appears to be way more room for a straight shot to the pan in the front. Also, if I run the drains into an accumulator and drain that into the pan, I only need one fitting in the pan.

    If I break the olds one more time, the wife is going to have an aneurism.

  8. #8

    Re: 455 milk shake

    Quote Originally Posted by H20MOFO View Post
    Imo...a water pressure gauge is a must. If my valve off the jet is wide open...I will see 30+ at w.o.t. With the valve adjusted to where I can idle for ever at 160* ish.....it stays under 10psi.
    That's because you have a hot rod engine!!! My old barge barely made enough HP to get it off the trailer.
    ****Disclaimer - I'm far from being an expert so you may want a second opinion!****

  9. #9
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    Re: 455 milk shake

    The reason for running the drains in the rear is because that's where the oil accumulates. Same reason your fuel pickups are in the rear of your tank(s), the fluids get pushed to the rear by sheer g-force.
    Last edited by David; 05-17-2012 at 10:50 AM.
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  10. #10

    Re: 455 milk shake

    Quote Originally Posted by Hotrodnailhead View Post
    Thanks for the info Tahiti and Wolfie, and I will also be installing a pressure gauge H20'... thanks!

    I ordered a bypass valve from Berkeley, and a head stud kit from ARP. I'm going to use victor intake gaskets, and fel-pro head gaskets. I also decided that I'm going to modify my timing cover/plate to make it more rigid and have better clamping force around the cooling passages. I'll try to take pictures as I go.

    I'm thinking about modifying the valve covers for oil drainage. I'm looking at the methods that others have done, and I'm curious why everyone runs the lines in the rear of the heads. There appears to be way more room for a straight shot to the pan in the front. Also, if I run the drains into an accumulator and drain that into the pan, I only need one fitting in the pan.

    If I break the olds one more time, the wife is going to have an aneurism.
    I would bet (I'm not much of an Olds guy) that the reason for having the drain in the rear is due to the fact that when you're running, the engine is tilted to an angle that gravity and momentum would push it to the rear. I'm not very knowledgeable on Olds' but what I have heard is that the oil return to the pan is very restricted and can run the bottom end dry of oil at sustained RPM's. If it were me, I'd probably do the setup that Steve (78_Tahiti) suggested. He's one of the few people I'd trust with an engine if my life depended on it. And from the sound of it, yours just may. My wife was ready to kill me over my boat as well until she met these great guys from Nor Cal!!!
    ****Disclaimer - I'm far from being an expert so you may want a second opinion!****

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