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millerboy74
12-10-2012, 10:12 PM
I'll I want for the next 50 years except in a 19' gullwing :biggrin:
http://youtu.be/Buj8ovUKbCo (http://youtu.be/Buj8ovUKbCo)
perferably this one7993what do you guys want for Christmas?

wolfie
12-10-2012, 10:57 PM
All I want for Christmas is a SWTD!!! Oh, wait, Christmas came early for me!!! Thanks Jill, Doug, David, and Steve!!!

Wild Hair
12-11-2012, 03:08 AM
I made that deal with Santa 3 years ago, it now sits in my garage. And by the way Santa no longer gets milk and cookies. Seems he is partial to Long Island "T"s and cheese sticks. :Chevy_anim::biggrin:

T8er S.
12-11-2012, 03:22 AM
Holly crap, I'll take that boat too! :boater:

newtojets
12-11-2012, 07:57 AM
there is a book out that is called santa responds! you should read it! as far as what i want from santa this year, well ave not quite decided.

White Lightning
12-11-2012, 03:39 PM
.....a 10-71 blower for my Kona.....:biggrin:
Rob

David
12-11-2012, 04:24 PM
...and a low profile twin turbo for my CV23... :15_8_200v:

PHOENIX
12-11-2012, 04:26 PM
.....a 10-71 blower for my Kona.....:biggrin:
Rob

I don't think there is a 10-71 http://www.dieselpro.com/detroit-diesel-blowers--sopladores.aspx
The Detroit Diesel Series 71 is a two-stroke (http://www.vintagejetboats.com/wiki/Two-stroke_diesel_engine) diesel engine (http://www.vintagejetboats.com/wiki/Diesel_engine) series, available in both inline (http://www.vintagejetboats.com/wiki/Straight_engine) and V (http://www.vintagejetboats.com/wiki/V_engine) configurations, with the inline models including one, two, three, four and six cylinders, and the V-types including six, eight, 12, 16 and 24 cylinders. The two largest V units used multiple cylinder heads per bank to keep the head size and weight to manageable proportions, the V-16 using four heads from the four-cylinder inline model and the V-24 using four heads from the inline six-cylinder model. This feature also assisted in keeping down the overall cost of these large engines by maintaining parts commonality with the smaller models.
The inline six-cylinder 71 series engine was introduced as the initial flagship product of the Detroit Diesel Engine Division (http://www.vintagejetboats.com/wiki/Detroit_Diesel) of General Motors (http://www.vintagejetboats.com/wiki/General_Motors_Corporation) in 1938. The V-type first appeared in 1957. The 71 in the model series designation refers to the displacement per cylinder (http://www.vintagejetboats.com/wiki/Engine_displacement) in cubic inches (actually 70.93 cu in / 1,162.4 cc). Bore and stroke is the same to all units, at 4.25 x 5.0 inches (107.95 x 127 mm).
All Series 71 engines utilize uniflow scavenging, where a gear (http://www.vintagejetboats.com/wiki/Gear)-driven Roots type blower (http://www.vintagejetboats.com/wiki/Roots_type_supercharger) mounted to the exterior of the engine provides intake air through cored passages in the engine block and ports in the cylinder walls at slightly greater than atmospheric pressure. The engine exhausts through pushrod-operated poppet valves (http://www.vintagejetboats.com/wiki/Poppet_valve) in the cylinder head(s), with either two or four valves per cylinder. Unit injection (http://www.vintagejetboats.com/wiki/Unit_Injector) is employed, one injector (http://www.vintagejetboats.com/wiki/Fuel_injection) per cylinder, with no high fuel pressure outside of the injector body. The injectors are cycled from the same camshaft (http://www.vintagejetboats.com/wiki/Camshaft) responsible for opening the exhaust valves.
As a two-stroke diesel engine cannot naturally aspirate (draw in) intake air, a blower is necessary to provide sufficient air to scavenge exhaust gasses from the cylinders and support combustion. Later high-performance versions were available with turbochargers (http://www.vintagejetboats.com/wiki/Turbocharge), and turbochargers with intercooling (http://www.vintagejetboats.com/wiki/Intercooler), the turbochargers discharging into the Roots blower intake.

Engines with out turbos are called natural (asperated) but there no such thing as they all have blowers and we all know "That's Not Natural". :zz22_yikes:

Sleek Freak
12-11-2012, 05:21 PM
they do make a 10-71 .
71-Series Blowers:

When pioneers like Gene Mooneyham first began adapting GMC 71-series blowers to racing applications it was a relatively easy task to decide what size to use: nearly everyone chose a 6-71 blower. This was mainly due to the fact that the old iron-block engines used throughout the early days of racing couldn't handle too much combustion
pressure without losing cylinder walls.
With the advent of the aftermarket aluminum block racing engines (equipped with replaceable cylinder sleeves), engine builders quickly discovered that they could use more boost, and the 8-71 became popular. The trend to larger displacement superchargers continued with 10-71, 12-71, 14-71, and even 16-71 size blowers being used.
Of course, size alone is not the sole criteria for determining which blower is best suited for any particular application. There are other factors to consider, such as rotor speed, clearances, and other internal modifications. Is a "tight" smaller blower better than a "loose" larger one? Or is it the other way around?
Because of these and other variables (such as engine displacement and compression, type of fuel burned, fuel system, application, etc.) it is recommended that you contact Mooneyham directly to determine which model blower and type of setup is best suited for your particular combination. Whatever you need, Mooneyham has it!

T8er S.
12-11-2012, 05:45 PM
they do make a 10-71 .
71-Series Blowers:

When pioneers like Gene Mooneyham first began adapting GMC 71-series blowers to racing applications it was a relatively easy task to decide what size to use: nearly everyone chose a 6-71 blower. This was mainly due to the fact that the old iron-block engines used throughout the early days of racing couldn't handle too much combustion
pressure without losing cylinder walls.
With the advent of the aftermarket aluminum block racing engines (equipped with replaceable cylinder sleeves), engine builders quickly discovered that they could use more boost, and the 8-71 became popular. The trend to larger displacement superchargers continued with 10-71, 12-71, 14-71, and even 16-71 size blowers being used.
Of course, size alone is not the sole criteria for determining which blower is best suited for any particular application. There are other factors to consider, such as rotor speed, clearances, and other internal modifications. Is a "tight" smaller blower better than a "loose" larger one? Or is it the other way around?
Because of these and other variables (such as engine displacement and compression, type of fuel burned, fuel system, application, etc.) it is recommended that you contact Mooneyham directly to determine which model blower and type of setup is best suited for your particular combination. Whatever you need, Mooneyham has it!

Preach it brother!!:worthy::worthy::worthy::worthy:

"THE ADVOCATE"
12-11-2012, 08:41 PM
All I really need is a stupid transom seal for my stupid new manual Place Diverter cable that is getting a Presidential Decision on the fabrication to adapt to the Jet O Vator. There must be something good out there?

PHOENIX
12-11-2012, 08:51 PM
I guess these guys are building a blower they call a 10-71 http://www.mooneyham-blowers.com/Pages/Products.aspx

But there was no 10-71 nor a 14-71 Detroit Diesel Engine built http://2-cycle.mtu-online.com/products/series-71
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Detroit_Diesel_Series_71